Julie Bartkus Helps Teams Motivate Great Staff!
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  • Giving Your Staff Feedback: Sugar and Sandwiches

    Posted on August 15th, 2009 teachersblog 3 comments

    FeedbacksmallerThe ability to get and give feedback is a practice that can propel your organization to reach new heights. However, there are many ineffective methods that leaders implement when trying to get and give feedback.

    Here are a couple for you to consider. It’s kind of funny that they both have to do with food – sugar and sandwiches!

    I’ll share with you the ineffective method of sugar coating first. Many times, leaders with their big hearts say to themselves: “Oh, I don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings so I won’t be as blunt as I should be” or “Today is not a good day to share that information because of the way she will react.” It’s important to understand that although your intent is good when you sugar coat feedback – - it is a dangerous style of communication, especially if there are behavioral issues that NEED to be addressed. When you sugar coat things, the employee gets the impression that everything is wonderful and dandy. And in the back of your mind you’re thinking, “Oh, my gosh! I wish they would change this. I wish they would do this differently. Why can’t they stop this?”

    There are also potential legal issues that you have to be careful of. Imagine a situation where you have an employee who really needs to make behavioral changes. You provide them with feedback. You don’t quite want to tell it to them like it is, so you sugar coat it. That’s documented. Then later on, things get worse and worse and worse. You keep sugar coating until one day you just fire the person. There have been law suits filed against employers where there’s not proper documentation in place to show that this employee was exhibiting poor behaviors and then given the opportunity to make constructive change happen. So be very careful with the nature of your conversations and how you’re giving that feedback. Think twice before you sugar coat things. Also remember, when you sugar coat, you’re also cheating your employees out of the opportunity to make constructive change happen.

    Now let’s move on to sandwiches. The other thing I’d like to caution you about when looking at giving feedback is the Sandwich Technique. Do you know what this is? The Sandwich Technique is a method of communication. You start off on a positive note, put the constructive stuff (negative feedback) in the middle and then finish on a positive note. On one of our audio programs at the Leadership Connection, Dr. Aubrey Daniels joined us. The issue was titled Positively Reinforcing Staff. He shared how the Sandwich Technique can really leave people feeling confused. They may walk away not really knowing if your message was positive or negative and unclear about the change you’re recommending. This means when the Sandwich Technique is used to provide feedback, the message that we need the person to hear isn’t heard.

    Ease up on sugar and sandwiches and not only will you lose weight, you’ll also take a load off of your mind through communicating directly and giving your staff the feedback that they need to hear to make constructive change happen.

  • Improve Your Child Care Performance Evaluation Forms

    Posted on June 21st, 2009 teachersblog No comments

    Child care leaders: Here’s your opportunity to improve your performance evaluation form!

    We’ve posted a conference call recording featuring consultant, Vicki Anderson, sample evaluation forms submitted by your colleagues, and a new evaluation form that Vicki created for you based on your feedback. Enjoy!

    Click here to access all of this information immediately.

    Listen in and discover:

    *Specific ways to improve your performance evaluation form.
    *Time-tested ideas to make them most effective.
    *Strategies to utilize your performance evaluation form as a tool for
    continued growth within your staff
    *Specific critiques of evaluation forms will be offered by nationally
    known expert, Vicki Anderson.